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The Teysha Journal — recycled

Teysha is a collective of explorers, travelers, designers, and adventurers. Take a peek behind the scenes of our handcrafted goods and our world travels.

Guate Boots - notes from the field

 Read on to learn more about some of the improvements and processes we're doing for Round 2 of Guate Boots! Yo folks, wanted to give y'all a little update on our efforts in Guatemala and a little forewarning that we are running out of space in Round 2 and that the price of our boots for round 3 may be going up a bit more. DEADLINE IS THURSDAY NIGHT! We have just released a whole bunch of beautiful vintage huipil tapestries so go check them out if you haven't reserved your pair. Now, I wanted to give y'all an update on the boot making front and the wonderful strides we're taking. First round, we made a quality boot but it...
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Journeys in Kuna Yala: Part One

The morning had begun bright and early, with me stepping out of my ocean side hut and leaving the quiet Isla Azuelo to go and hang out on Carti Sugdup. The Kuna community comes alive by 6:45 am, and it being Satrurday all the kids were outside playing volleyball, soccer, running around. I heard some music and peered through a line of huts and saw the whoosh and whirl of big skirts. As I peeped in, there was a group of about 20 kids practicing the "tipico" dance of the Los Santos region in the Azuero Peninsula. Not a community related to the Kunas, but the children were practicing the dances for a school celebration of Panamanian cultures. The boys...
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Kuna Kicks: an investment into people and nature.

 The Kuna are a vibrant people, fiercely independent, and live in one of the most beautiful places in the world. They inhabit the Comarca Kuna Yala, an autonomous region of Panama that consists of roughly 360 absolutely stunning islands off of the Panamanian isthmus and the inward strip of the mainland.  On these lands they live a very traditional lifestyle and sustain themselves through fishing in their dugout canoes, subsistence agriculture, hunting, gathering, their art form (Mola making), and, increasingly so, tourism. Their islands boast a gazillion coconuts palms, sand so soft you might decide to stay, and, of course, hammocks galore. In fact, the Kuna revere hammocks so much they are married, buried, and even conduct official village business...
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